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Chance and Evidence

Wednesday, September 5, 2018 - 5:00pm
Mathematical Institute, Radcliffe Observatory Quarter, Woodstock Road Oxford OX2 6GG
L1

In this lecture Persi Diaconis will take a look at some of our most primitive images of chance - flipping a coin, rolling a roulette wheel and shuffling cards - and via a little bit of mathematics (and a smidgen of physics) show that sometimes things are not very random at all. Indeed chance is sometimes confused with frequency and this confusion caries over to a confusion between chance and evidence. All of which explains our wild misuse of probability and statistical models.

Persi Diaconis is world-renowned for his study of mathematical problems involving randomness and randomisation. He is the co-author of 'Ten Great Ideas about Chance (2017) and is the Mary V. Sunseri Professor of Statistics and Mathematics at Stanford University. 

Please email external-relations@maths.ox.ac.uk to register.

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The Oxford Mathematics Public Lectures are generously supported by XTX Markets.

Audience: 
Open to all