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Sarah Thomas

Postdoctoral Fellow
Sarah Thomas

Sarah has lectured widely in Australia and the UK, and held various curatorial positions. She has a strong and active publishing record, most recently on the art history and museology of the British empire, the role and particularities of the itinerant artist, and the iconography of slavery. Major publications include an award-winning book, The Encounter, 1802: Art of the Flinders and Baudin Voyages (Art Gallery of South Australia, 2002), book chapters including ‘Slaves and the spectacle of torture: British artists in the New World, 1800-1834’ and ‘Allegorizing Extinction: Humboldt, Darwin and the Valedictory Image’, and journal articles such as ‘The Spectre of Empire in the British Art Museum’ (Museum History Journal) (forthcoming 2013/14). In 2001 her professional standing was recognised by the award of an Australian Government Centenary Medal for service to Australian society and art. In 2012 she completed a doctoral thesis, Witnessing Slavery: Travelling Artists in an Age of Abolition. She is the current recipient of a Cultural Engagement Fellowship from the University of Oxford, and is working with curators at Tate Britain on a forthcoming exhibition on the subject of art and the British empire.