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Thomas Aquinas

Thursday, May 17, 2018 -
1:00pm to 2:00pm
Radcliffe Humanities, Oxford OX2 6GG
Seminar Room

Thomas Aquinas on Bodily Identity is a study of the union of matter and the soul in the human being in the thought of the Dominican Thomas Aquinas. At first glance this issue might appear arcane, but it was at the centre of polemic with heresy in the thirteenth century and at the centre of the development of medieval thought more broadly. The book argues that theological issues, especially the need for an identical body to be resurrected at the end of time, but also considerations about Christ's crucifixion and saints' relics, were central to Aquinas's account of how human beings are constituted. The book explores in particular how theological questions and concerns shaped Aquinas's thought on individuality and personal and bodily identity over time, his embryology and understanding of heredity, his work on nutrition and bodily growth, and his fundamental conception of matter itself. It demonstrates, up-close, how Aquinas used his peripatetic sources, Aristotle and (especially) Averroes, to frame and further his own thinking in these areas. The book also indicates how Aquinas's thought on bodily identity became pivotal to university debates and relations between the rival mendicant orders in the late thirteenth and early fourteenth centuries, and that quarrels surrounding these issues persisted into the fifteenth century. 

Author Antonia Fitzpatrick (History, University of Oxford) joins an expert panel to discuss the book and its themes: 

Cecilia Trifogli (Philosophy, University of Oxford)

William Wood (Theology and Religion, University of Oxford)

This event will be chaired by Emily Corran (History, University of Oxford). 

Lunch provided from 12.30pm. Discussion from 1-2pm.

Booking is essential. Register here.

Part of Book at Lunchtime, a fortnightly series of bite sized book discussions, with commentators from a range of disciplines.

Contact name: 
Rabyah Khan
Audience: 
Open to all